App Store Descriptions are Gifts to UX Designers

When I’m starting to research a new client’s digital product, one of my favorite places to go is the app stores. This is where companies have an opportunity to identify their product in the most concise terms possible.

Let’s take a look at how Instagram describes themselves in the app stores: ‘Over 300 million users love Instagram! … It’s a simple way to capture and share the world’s moments on your phone … customize … transform … share your photos and videos … follow … Facebook, Twitter … ’ [note: I’ve added the elipses to cull the key words].

If we view their marketing copy on their web site, it is different. It includes their slogan: ‘Capture and Share the World’s Moments’; but it doesn’t emphasize simple or the number of users. The keywords here are: fast, beautiful, fun, easy, free, Facebook, Twitter.

It’s hard to argue with such a successful company like Instagram. We can assume that they market their product differently on the web vs in the app store for a reason, probably based on analytics. With less prestigious companies, however, such as newer startups, I have found that such choices are not intentional – but mistakes. For example, an LA startup I worked with had contrasting copy on their Android vs iOS descriptions. This revealed several user experience holes in the company’s product.

When a company is inconsistent with their marketing copy, it reveals the truth about the company – that they have a fractured organization, where one hand doesn’t know what the other hand is doing. For example, the marketing team isn’t in-line with the engineering or product teams. And thus they are chasing different goals. Ultimately, it’s the user who pays for these inefficiencies. An analogy is a child whose parents disagree; one parent says so-and-so is bad; whereas the other parent says so-and-so is fine. The child ends up confused as to which message is the correct one. Similarly, if a company sends mixed messages to its users, those users will wind up confused and/or missing out on understanding key features about the product.

As a user experience designer, these kinds of mistakes are opportunities to do good – to help a company align its message. We can find out whom is responsible for writing the copy; for posting the copy to the app store; and for driving the strategy behind the copy. And then we unite those persons through documentation – maybe just emails – but ideally, through healthy discussions, whiteboarding and Google Docs. Soon, the message will become succinct; teams will become unified; the design will reflect that unified message – and users will reap the benefits.

Lastly, I’d like to emphasize how much a unified message can effect a company’s revenue. If their message is unified, it will be reflected in how their users talk about the product. Like the game of telephone, if the message is simple, it will remain intact after countless numbers of persons have re-iterated it. Same with a digital product’s message – it has more of a chance of going viral if it’s succinct and concise – and, of course, reflective of a succinct and concise product.

UX Tool: UserVoice.com

One way this ux tool UserVoice can be used is to quickly install a forum in your company’s website to get feedback from colleagues while iterating on a Product Roadmap. Thus, everybody has buy-in while components of the Roadmap are being developed.  Your colleagues can submit and up-vote/down-vote ideas.*

From the UserVoice website:

What is UserVoice?

UserVoice is a software-as-a-service provider of customer support tools that include:

  • Feedback forums to understand the ideas users care about most.
  • A support ticket system to track and respond to customer support requests.
  • A knowledge base to answer common questions and help users find the information they need when they need it.

*additional info: Bruce McCarthy, Lean Roadmapping: Where Product Management & UX Meet. Video. UIE.com